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Not all car accidents involve more than one vehicle, and not all accidents come at the fault of a driver. Road conditions and equipment are sometimes the culprit. Just because you’ve been in a single car accident doesn’t mean you’re at fault: there may be a problem with your vehicle, poor road maintenance or design, or you may have hit an animal in the road (or swerved to avoid one and hit something else instead).

What to do in a single car accident

Like in other collisions, the first step is to pull over and assess the situation. Make sure that the roadway is clear and your stopping position is safe for other traffic.

Legal options

While many single car accidents are determined to be the driver’s fault, there are exceptions. Wildlife related collisions are generally not the liability of another driver, nor are accidents caused by driving too fast for road conditions (including weather), but many single car accidents are the result of external factors that were caused by others.

  • Another driver
    If another car in the road was involved but was not damaged in a collision that driver may still be liable, such as an inattentive driver that caused you to leave your designated lane and crash.
  • Equipment failure
    If the vehicle malfunctions due to faulty design or construction, then the manufacturer may be liable.
  • Poor road maintenance or signage
    This does not include bad weather. Instead, if a road’s physical condition is so poor that the vehicle could not operate properly, or if poorly placed signs are a factor in the accident, the road’s managing entity may be at fault.

Even in a single car crash, drivers should document and report any damages that led to the accident. Just because no other cars were damaged doesn’t always mean the driver is to blame.